2017 was the second-warmest year on record per NASA; Trend continued even without El Niño, which helped make 2016 the hottest.

January 18 2018 by James Hansen[a], Makiko Sato[a], Reto Ruedy[b,c], Gavin A. Schmidt[c], Ken Lo[b,c], Avi Persin[b,c]  Read full article here

  • Global surface temperature in 2017 was the second highest in the period of instrumental measurements in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) analysis. 
  • Relative to average temperature for 1880-1920, which we take as an appropriate estimate of “pre-industrial” temperature, 2017 was +1.17°C (~2.1°F) warmer than in the 1880-1920 base period.  The high 2017 temperature, unlike the record 2016 temperature, was obtained without any boost from tropical El Niño warming.

Fig. 1. (a) Global surface temperatures relative to 1880-1920 based on GISTEMP data, which employs GHCN.v3 for meteorological stations, NOAA ERSST.v5 for sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research station data[1].

Fig. 1. (a) Global surface temperatures relative to 1880-1920 based on GISTEMP data, which employs GHCN.v3 for meteorological stations, NOAA ERSST.v5 for sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research station data[1].

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From NOAA:

  • The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for 2017 was the third highest since record keeping began in 1880, according to NOAA scientists. December’s combined global land and ocean average surface temperature departure from average was the fourth warmest December in the 138-year record.
  • In a separate analysis of global temperature data, released today, NASA scientists ranked 2017 to be the second warmest on record, behind the record year 2016. The minor difference in rankings is due to the different methods used by the two agencies to analyze global temperatures, although over the long term the agencies’ records remain in strong agreement. Both analyses show that the five warmest years on record all have taken place since 2010.

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